An Influencer Introduction With Jenna Moreci

Jenna Moreci shares their favorite tools, how they grow their audience, how they find sponsors, and more.

1 of 12What question are you asked the most when you tell someone you're a blogger/content creator?

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Probably some variation of “How do you make money?” or “Wait—so, you get paid to do this?” People are still so mystified by the idea of Youtube being a job.

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2 of 12How do brands find you?

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I’m pretty much exclusively discovered via my Youtube channel. From that point, they contact me through my Website .

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3 of 12Is there anything that you believe a brand should know before they begin reaching out to influencers?

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It’s important to consider the pitch from the influencer’s perspective. I’ve received a number of offers that promise to pay me in t-shirts, paraphernalia, and of course, exposure. Being an influencer isn’t a traditional career, but it pays our bills nonetheless. And remember, you’re coming to us for exposure, so promising to return the favor isn’t going to carry much weight. I have a loyal, passionate audience, and I’m happy to introduce you to them, provided the arrangement is handled with professionalism.

Additionally, you have to consider the timing. Many of us film our videos weeks in advance and plan them months beforehand. If you ask a Youtuber to promote your product that week, or even the week after, nine times out of ten, you’re going to be met with rejection. I’d recommend planning your influencer pitches at least one month ahead of time. No matter how great the offer is, we can’t accept it if we already have content filmed and ready to go.

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4 of 12What one tool for your content or your business can you not live without?

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All I really need is my laptop. I can get by without my mic, without a lens, but my laptop? That thing is by my side 24/7

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5 of 12How do you decide how much to charge a brand?

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It depends on the partnership and the platform. For example, promotion via one of my smaller platforms, like Instagram, means I’m going to charge a smaller fee. But if we’re negotiating a sponsorship via Youtube, which is a lot more common for me, I typically charge about one dollar per one hundred subscribers.

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6 of 12What was the biggest challenge you had to overcome when starting out?

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I honestly think the biggest challenge is just sticking to it. It can take months or even years for a channel to experience exponential growth. I’ve seen a lot of other influencers get impatient really fast. Fortunately for me, I’m a stubborn little nut. I don’t give up easily.

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7 of 12How do you personally keep your content true to your voice while also delivering value to a brand?

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I only partner with brands that I truly believe can benefit my audience. I have a reputation in the Authortube community for being brutally honest, and this is largely why my audience is loyal—they know I’ll give it to ‘em straight. So I can’t very well recommend a product if I don’t believe in it. If I’m partnering with a company, it means I’m giving them my personal stamp of approval.

As for staying true to my voice, the key for me is to keep things light, simple, and a little silly. A lot of people go into salesman-mode when they promote a product. Your audience can sense the shift instantly. Instead, I talk about the company as if I’m talking to a friend. I throw in my usual brand of humor and sass, which my audience expects. I crack jokes, and most importantly, I keep it casual. Sometimes it can be as simple as taking a required mention like “Brand A provides services including X, Y, and Z, as well as several thousand other courses,” and rephrasing it as “Brand A features a ton of services like X, Y, Z, and a bunch of other stuff.” It might sound trivial, but it makes a difference.

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8 of 12What is the biggest challenge you face now that you have an established audience?

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As my audience grows, the workload increases. Don’t get me wrong, this is a great thing. I have sponsorships with fantastic companies, I have loyal subscribers requesting fun content, I have giveaways and tags and a bunch of other opportunities. But it’s a ton of work, much more than most people usually assume. I’m swimming in emails, contracts, merchandise, equipment, and more emails. I’m at the point where I need to buckle down and hire staff, but the act of hiring is work in itself! Maybe I just need a vacation.

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9 of 12What helps you maintain your motivation to continue creating content?

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First of all, I really enjoy the audience interaction. They send me the sweetest messages. It’s humbling to see how many people appreciate and value your hard work.

Additionally, my Youtube content is the reason I’m able to do what I love for a living. I’m a fulltime author on top of being an influencer, and my readership found me via my channel. Youtube was the perfect way for me to brand myself as a writer and launch my author platform.

Lastly, let’s be real—the money is nice. Don’t get me wrong, I love my job—both of them, actually. But not everyone can love their job and still pay their mortgage. I’m grateful my passion is lucrative.

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10 of 12What's the one piece of advice you would give to someone just starting out in content creation?

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As cheesy as it sounds, be yourself. Well, let me rephrase—be the most interesting version of yourself. Filming my content is easy, because I’m just being Jenna. But realistically, sometimes I’m also grouchy, or lazy, or whiny. My audience doesn’t need to see those Jennas.

And here’s a second piece of advice for free: get to the point. It’s okay if your videos are lengthy, so long as they’re not all filler. No one wants to listen to you ramble. Speak with intention.

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11 of 12What is your most defining piece of content in your opinion? Why?

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Probably my satirical writing videos, particularly my Worst Pet Peeve series. In these videos, I break down character types people hate reading about, romantic clichés, things you shouldn’t say to a writer, and other common gripes within the industry. These videos are easily my most popular, because they’re both informative and really funny. Everyone loves a good rant, especially when they’re filled with truth bombs and salacious humor.

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12 of 12What brands would you most like to work with?

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I love working with companies that revolve around writing, reading, and creativity in all (or most) forms. Audible and IngramSpark are a couple that instantly come to mind. I’m especially intrigued when companies offer pitches that benefit both my influencer and author platform. For example, a company I’m currently working with designed bookish merchandise in the theme of my upcoming novel. This was such an amazing experience, and the attention they paid to my writing career makes me all the more excited about promoting them and staying connected in the future.

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