An Influencer Introduction With Say No to Rage

Say No to Rage shares their favorite tools, how they grow their audience, how they find sponsors, and more.

1 of 13What question are you asked the most when you tell someone you’re a Streamer?

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A variety of puzzled looks followed by questions like, “So how does that work?” “You do what now?” “So people just watch you play video games?”

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2 of 13How do brands find you?

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Most of the brands that I am partnered with are ones that I reached out to. Lately, however, brands reach out via my business email in my twitter profile header.

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3 of 13Is there anything that you believe a brand should know before they begin reaching out to streamers?

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They should attempt, to some degree, to be familiar with the identity, brand, and type of content that a streamer creates.

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4 of 13What one tool for your stream can you not live without?

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The elgato stream deck has become a literal easy button while streaming.

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5 of 13How do you decide how much to charge a brand?

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This is somewhat new territory for me. I typically base my rate off the sponsored rate that Twitch uses for its bounty board. It’s an easy way to say, “Here is my perceived value.”

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6 of 13What was the biggest challenge you had to overcome when starting out?

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Branching out from the game that helped me have initial growth. It was hard for a variety of reasons. First, it’s demoralizing to see “support” seemingly vanish just because you switch games. Second, I knew deep down that diversifying was important and would be slower and more challenging growth.

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7 of 13How do you personally keep your content true to your voice while also delivering value to a brand?

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I always ask two questions. What more can I do to add value to my stream? This makes me analyze everything I am doing. The podcasts, Q&A segments, characters, etc. Everything can be critiqued or improved upon. The second question is, Is there anything new I can do that nobody else is doing? Every idea can be iterated on, improved upon, or just thrown at the wall to see if it sticks.

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8 of 13What is the biggest challenge you face now that you have an established audience?

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Diversification is practically impossible. I’ve been streaming for 3 and half years and I still can only bring about 50% of my audience with me when I switch games. I’m only now to the point where I’m confident in the value and entertainment enough to ignore the metrics and just create good content. There are lots of things Twitch could do to help with discoverability. But until those things happen, streamers have to fill their “audience funnel” as much as they can and try to branch out when they can and when they think it is the most strategic

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9 of 13How did you grow your audience when you started out?

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I stuck with Borderlands 2 and just streamed as much as possible. I did everything I could to keep myself talking and the audience engaged. It was exhausting, but it helped me develop good habits and endurance for long streams and constant dialogue and talking.

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10 of 13What helps you maintain your motivation to continue streaming?

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Passion and drive has to be woven together. Too much passion and you will burn out and struggle to be disciplined and stick to goals and schedules. Too much drive and you will become to mechanistic and artificial. I get so energized by interacting with people that Twitch chat always feels like a B12 shot. So that motivates my drive to do everything I can to protect, grow, and sustain my passion.

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11 of 13What’s the one piece of advice you would give to someone just starting out in streaming?

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Block out time, stick to the schedule, and be realistic. It’s a marathon and your life commitments, responsibilities, and relationships can’t be sacrificed on the altar of “streaming”. Most people don’t make it out of the category of “hobbyist” or “enthusiast”. Turning this into a profession is unlikely, so hold it loosely when starting out.

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12 of 13What makes you stand out most to your fans among other streamers?

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I interact with my chat more than virtually any streamer on the platform. Monday through Friday I have so many “worker lurkers” who treat my stream like a radio show. They can listen and not even watch. That’s a huge compliment. My content is good enough to sustain a significant audience of folks who rarely “see” what I am doing on stream.

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13 of 13What brands would you most like to work with?

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I think Loot Crate is missing an ENORMOUS amount of potential by not working with streamers like myself. I wear their shirts, debate pop culture, movies, comics, and game all day. Monthly giveaway codes and box openings would be a HUGE hit.

Any esports organization that wants shoutcasters would be a perfect fit for a lane of diversification that I want to break into. My shoutcasting of Fortnite received strong praise, even from GoldenBoy himself.

Organizations that need hosts and interviewers would also be a fantastic fit. I’ve been doing a podcast for 3 years and got fantastic feedback from the mentors at the Hosting and Interview Workshop at Twitch.

I think the Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon is ripe for work with Twitch. Ninja was just recently on the show, so many groundwork has been laid. The comedic style, writing, and youthfulness of the show would be a perfect fit for segments on Twitch.

Lastly, Coke. I’m a huge Coke fan and would be thrilled at the chance.

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